Ditch the GPS; Get Lost Instead #change11

In Cognitive Surplus, Clay Shirky points out that major changes to society often happen so quickly they don’t leave time for anyone to adjust. This results in chaos that traditional solutions can’t fix. In fact, tradition has been displaced. There is no plan for going forward, but no way to go back. Shirky’s main example is the beginning of the Industrial Era in London when a rapid influx of people into the city created social chaos, new opportunities for leisure, and mass drunkenness. Eventually, people began to use their surplus time to organize, become educated, and develop civic infrastructure. Ergo, we have modern democracy. (Sort of)

We are entering an era of chaos. The traditional approaches to education are being challenged by rapid changes in technology and economic pressures. And if the old model falls, we’re simply not ready to replace it. We don’t have any good ideas. Or…we have a lot of good ideas but no big picture.

In his opening post for Week 13 of #change11 MOOC, Clark Quinn addresses this problem:

I’m really arguing for the need to come up with a broader perspective on learning.  I’ve been calling it learning experience design, but really it’s more.  It’s a combination of performance support and learning (and it’s badly in need of some branding help). The notion is a sort-of personal GPS for your knowledge work. It’s knows where you want to go (since you told it), and it knows where you are geographically and semantically (via GPS and your calendar), and as it recognizes the context it can provide not only support in the moment, but layers on learning along the way.  And I think that we don’t know really how to look at things this way yet; we don’t have design models (to think about the experience conceptually), we don’t have design processes (to go from goal to solution), and we don’t have tools (to deliver this integrated experience).  Yet the limits are not technological; we have the ability to build the systems if we can conceptualize the needed framework.

[….] There’s lots more: addressing the epistemology of learners, mobile technologies, meta-learning & 21st C skills, and deep analytics and semantic systems, to name a few, but I think we need to start with the right conceptions.

Quinn suggests we think about “slow learning” as a way to make the reality of how our brains work match the pace and functional aspects of education design.

This sounds great. What I don’t like is GPS as a metaphor. The problem is that the GPS simultaneously knows too much and too little. Have you ever watched someone follow their GPS around and around the block, expecting the little robot to do all the work? Chances are, if the driver would just look up and read a few street signs or use common sense, he could save 15 minutes of wandering.

We need to get lost. We don’t need our locations constantly re-calibrated. Learning often means getting lost in the woods and finding your way out. It doesn’t mean having a controlling voice talking you through everything, measure, assessing, re-assessing. That’s one of the big problems with education now. Let’s not replace a human program with a digital one. You can’t hear yourself think with such a dominant narrator.

A better metaphor, I think, is the Hero’s Journey of Joseph Campbell. Most of those myths would have been utterly destroyed with the careful directions and constant updates of a GPS. Heck, even Luke Skywalker, in his world of advanced technical wizardry, needed to close the blast shield and listen to his own voice .

It might be trite, but it might be true: do we need to focus more on the journey, less on the destination? (Destinations are good, too). The GPS won’t shut up until the correct result is reached. We become dependent. We need her every time we go somewhere. We never learn to shut her off and read the landscape directly.

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2 Comments

  1. Agree about the GPS metaphor. The little machine leaves you no place in the world to go where you “don’t know where you are”. Sometimes it’s good to be released from the obligation to know, to be confronted by something you can’t instantly tame by naming. We teach by colonizing everything into a familiar image. Rather than voyaging in hopes of being knocked off our assumptions we search everywhere for evidence of ourselves. That’s me in a different hat. That’s me in sandals made from exotic lizards. That’s me in the middle of the picture blocking the view of where I am.

    Try “The Wayfinders” by Wade Davis.

    I like what I’ve read by Quinn and what you’ve written. Maybe he was having a bad metaphor day?

    Scott

    Reply
  1. Rhizomes and education. What would my ideal learning situation be? #change11 « connectiv

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